Guest Post: The Line Between Good And Evil With M.E. Rhimes

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July 31st saw the release of M.E. Rhimes’ newest novel, Sink.

32948972This is a mermaid fantasy, almost similar to the original Little Mermaid fairy tale. Once Pauline finds out the dark truth of what happens to the human men mermaids are betrothed to, she finds herself unable to bite her tongue any longer, even if it’s at the displeasure of her tyrannical mother, Queen Calypso. In her attempt to do good, she might find herself repeating the circle again – because no mermaids kiss comes without warning.

It should be a great young adult fantasy novel about breaking tradition, identity and young love.

As part of the Book Blitz, Rhimes took the time to write a piece on the line between good and evil, on love and what makes a rememberable antagonist. I’m pleased to share it with you.


Good And Evil – The Almost Invisible Line

It only takes a quick flip through the pages of the most beloved and timeless books to find one common theme – love. And with good reason. Romance is enchanting, intoxicating, exciting, and arguably down right addictive. You’d be hard-pressed to find anything in the universe holding more influence. It can create a hypothetical fairy tale, filling our hearts and minds with visions of eternal happiness and happily
ever-after. Unfortunately, we learn as we grow it’s not all warm and fuzzy wonder. There’s a dark side to love. One that can take a perfectly innocent heart and crush it to pieces. It is from these ashes that villains are made.

Unfortunately, we learn as we grow it’s not all warm and fuzzy wonder. There’s a dark side to love. One that can take a perfectly innocent heart and crush it to pieces. It is from these ashes that villains are made.

If you’ve ever read one of my books, you’ll notice I have a pension for zooming in on the uncomfortable creation of evil. I’m a strong believer that in life we’re all born with an equal chance of going one way or the other. None of us are born wicked; we’re made that way. The path to hero or villain is complicated, dependent on circumstance, coping skills and surrounding support systems (or lack thereof).

To write a great villain, you should be willing to wade in their realm. See the world through their eyes and justify their actions, even if your hero/heroine can’t. Heartbreak is a powerful catalyst for action, and allowing a glimpse into your antagonist’s perspective adds an entirely different layer to the story.

The very best villains, the ones who stick with us past the final pages, are the ones we can relate to in some way. When we can say, “I understand why he/she feels the way they do, and I could’ve gone that direction, too,” we can truly immerse ourselves in the story. Once we’re that invested, we can get excited when the heroine defeats that darkness, because in some strange way it’s like they did it for us. The difference between the good and evil may seem like a chasm, but I think when you take a closer look, it’s more like a crack.

Once we’re that invested, we can get excited when the heroine defeats that darkness, because in some strange way it’s like they did it for us. The difference between the good and evil may seem like a chasm, but I think when you take a closer look, it’s more like a crack.


RhinesAUTHOR BIO

M.E. Rhines a southwest Florida native currently living in North Port with her two beautiful children and a third, much larger child whom she affectionately calls husband.
She writes young adult paranormal romance to feed her belief that fairy tales are real and nonsense is necessary.She also writes adult romances under her edgier alter-ego, Mary Bernsen.

Author links:


Sink can be purchased from Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and Kobo.

This book can be found on Goodreads.

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happy reading

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One thought on “Guest Post: The Line Between Good And Evil With M.E. Rhimes

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