Guest Post: The Line Between Good And Evil With M.E. Rhimes

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July 31st saw the release of M.E. Rhimes’ newest novel, Sink.

32948972This is a mermaid fantasy, almost similar to the original Little Mermaid fairy tale. Once Pauline finds out the dark truth of what happens to the human men mermaids are betrothed to, she finds herself unable to bite her tongue any longer, even if it’s at the displeasure of her tyrannical mother, Queen Calypso. In her attempt to do good, she might find herself repeating the circle again – because no mermaids kiss comes without warning.

It should be a great young adult fantasy novel about breaking tradition, identity and young love.

As part of the Book Blitz, Rhimes took the time to write a piece on the line between good and evil, on love and what makes a rememberable antagonist. I’m pleased to share it with you.


Good And Evil – The Almost Invisible Line

It only takes a quick flip through the pages of the most beloved and timeless books to find one common theme – love. And with good reason. Romance is enchanting, intoxicating, exciting, and arguably down right addictive. You’d be hard-pressed to find anything in the universe holding more influence. It can create a hypothetical fairy tale, filling our hearts and minds with visions of eternal happiness and happily
ever-after. Unfortunately, we learn as we grow it’s not all warm and fuzzy wonder. There’s a dark side to love. One that can take a perfectly innocent heart and crush it to pieces. It is from these ashes that villains are made.

Unfortunately, we learn as we grow it’s not all warm and fuzzy wonder. There’s a dark side to love. One that can take a perfectly innocent heart and crush it to pieces. It is from these ashes that villains are made.

If you’ve ever read one of my books, you’ll notice I have a pension for zooming in on the uncomfortable creation of evil. I’m a strong believer that in life we’re all born with an equal chance of going one way or the other. None of us are born wicked; we’re made that way. The path to hero or villain is complicated, dependent on circumstance, coping skills and surrounding support systems (or lack thereof).

To write a great villain, you should be willing to wade in their realm. See the world through their eyes and justify their actions, even if your hero/heroine can’t. Heartbreak is a powerful catalyst for action, and allowing a glimpse into your antagonist’s perspective adds an entirely different layer to the story.

The very best villains, the ones who stick with us past the final pages, are the ones we can relate to in some way. When we can say, “I understand why he/she feels the way they do, and I could’ve gone that direction, too,” we can truly immerse ourselves in the story. Once we’re that invested, we can get excited when the heroine defeats that darkness, because in some strange way it’s like they did it for us. The difference between the good and evil may seem like a chasm, but I think when you take a closer look, it’s more like a crack.

Once we’re that invested, we can get excited when the heroine defeats that darkness, because in some strange way it’s like they did it for us. The difference between the good and evil may seem like a chasm, but I think when you take a closer look, it’s more like a crack.


RhinesAUTHOR BIO

M.E. Rhines a southwest Florida native currently living in North Port with her two beautiful children and a third, much larger child whom she affectionately calls husband.
She writes young adult paranormal romance to feed her belief that fairy tales are real and nonsense is necessary.She also writes adult romances under her edgier alter-ego, Mary Bernsen.

Author links:


Sink can be purchased from Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and Kobo.

This book can be found on Goodreads.

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happy reading

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Book Talk | Why I DNF Books

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DNF’ing is something that can divide book lovers – after all, can you really say you didn’t like a book if you didn’t finish it?

Personally, I DNF books a lot.

I didn’t when I was younger but recently, I just don’t have time to dedicate to books that I’m just not enjoying reading, whatever the reason. In this post, I’m just going to outline some of the reasons – and some of the books – I’ve DNF’ed.

 

Far Too Slow To Start

32969235There’s a difference between a slow start and a snail’s pace. This usually happens with worlds and societies that aren’t like our own. They start with too much worldbuilding that doesn’t make sense at first glance, they don’t attach you to the main character, they don’t really describe anything making it hard to get a sense of space.

The Evaporation of Sofi Snow is one of those books – I was interested in the premise, this dystopian world with aliens and bloody games and the search to find a brother that may or may not be alive – but the opening d r a g g e d. There was action but nothing happened. I still had no idea why anything was happening and ultimately wasn’t entertained enough to keep reading.

 

Uncomfortable Subjects

In this, I’m not talking about important uncomfortable subjects. Conversations on abuse 30965707and homophobia and mental illness are all things that I think should be covered and discussed in literature. I’m talking about things like bestiality, which honestly wasn’t something I thought I would ever put on a list until I read How To Be Human.

It was sold me to as a story about mental health and obsession and the claustrophobia of suburban life. Instead what I got was a woman growing strangely attached to a fox in her garden and a would be case of child kidnapping. I got half way through this book before I decided that I wasn’t imagining things, this was really going where I thought it was and stopped reading.

 

34455622Gross Treatment of Women

This also applies to other minority groups but for Superpowerless, it’s women. This book had such a good premise and the opening was really promising – it reminded me of A World Without You, where it’s hard to tell whether these superpowers are real or imagined. There was a glimpse into the fraught relationship between a teenage boy and their mother – and then suddenly said teenage boy was watching his female next door neighbour sunbathing through a telescope in his bedroom. It was just …. gross and unnecessary and I found it really hard to keep reading after that and eventually, just stopped entirely.

 

Just Stopped Caring33823946

Or did I ever care? That’s the question. I read books to be entertained and to immerse myself in other worlds and if I literally don’t care what’s happening, there’s no point in reading. That’s what happened to me in Rose Petal Graves. It had such a promising blurb about fae and family feuds and spirits coming back from the dead but as I was reading, I realised I was just doing it to get to the end. I didn’t care about the characters, I kept checking the percentage on my kindle to see how much more I had to read. I reasoned with those around me whether it was okay to just stop. So I did.

 

But these are just my reasons.

What are your reasons for DNF’ing a book? Have you ever? Leave a comment below!